Inspiring Quotes from Trevor Noah’s Born a Crime

I recently read Trevor Noah’s Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood, and absolutely loved it! Here are a few quotes that really resonated with me:

On racism and inequality:

People love to say, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” What they don’t say is, “And it would be nice if you gave him a fishing rod.” That’s the part of the analogy that’s missing.

Trevor Noah, Born a Crime, Stories from a South African Childhood

This year we have seen protests all around the world demanding that we address the racism in our country. Specifically, there is systemic, institutional racism that is somehow allowed in our country, that disadvantages black and brown people from attaining the same status and accessing the same opportunities as those more privileged. Those who have privilege often think that ‘Poor people don’t work hard enough’, but the reality is they are not given the same opportunities.

On growth and comfort zones:

Comfort can be dangerous. Comfort provides a floor but also a ceiling.

Trevor Noah, Born a Crime, Stories from a South African Childhood

A solid reminder that every accomplishment starts with the decision to try (a quote by JFK), and that our limitations are self-imposed. It is a reminder to keep breaking through your comfort zone, because what lies outside of it is the potential for something beautiful.

On abusive and toxic relationships:

Growing up in a home of abuse, you struggle with the notion that you can love a person you hate, or hate a person you love. It’s a strange feeling. You want to live in a world where someone is good or bad, where you either love or hate them, but that’s not how people are.

Trevor Noah, Born a Crime, Stories from a South African Childhood

People are not innately all good or all bad, and that sucks for our mind, which tries to categorize and organize, to make sense of what is going on. One of the reasons it is so hard to leave a toxic or abusive relationship is because of something called “lock-in”, which Dr. Meg Jay defines as the “decreased likelihood to search for other options, or to change to another option, once an investment in something has been made”. We keep giving chances to people who do not want to change, and end up getting hurt. My heart goes out to anyone who has experienced this and remember that you are not alone.

What are some favorite books you have read this year?

Got any favorite books you have read this year or favorites in general? Let me know of any recommendations in the comments!

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